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Remote Desktop Connection Client for Mac:
Reports and Tips

Running Windows Apps from a Mac over a network

Updated September 26, 2007
For more MacWindows pages on running Windows on Macs, click here.

If you’ve have some RDC knowledge you'd like to share, about your experiences.

About Remote Desktop Client

Microsoft Remote Desktop Connetion Client for Mac (RDC) is a free download that enables a Mac to access and run applications residing on a Windows machine over a network. RDC enables you to copy and paste between Mac and Windows applications. You can also use RDC to move files between Mac and Windows PCs.

The Windows machine can be a Windows XP Professional workstation with Remote Desktop Services turned on. It can also be a server running Terminal Server or Remote Desktop Services.

Microsoft currently has a beta of an Intel-native (universal binary) version of RDC.

Reader Reports on RDC

Microsoft Remote Desktop Client for Mac OS X

On July 17, 2002 at Macworld Expo today, Microsoft announced the Remote Desktop Connection (RDC) client for Mac OS X, a free download that enables remote connection and control of Windows PCs computers over a network. It lets Macs connect to Terminal Services on NT 4 Terminal Server, Windows 2000 Server, Windows XP clients (for remote help) and Windows .NET servers. Readers have been enthusastic about it.

July 18, 2002
Darren Montjar, creator of the "Mystery Machine" Citrix Java client for OS X, sent us some first impressions of the new Microsoft Remote Desktop Client for Mac OS X, a client for that was announced yesterday. RDC lets Macs connect to Windows PC running Terminal Services or Remote Desktop Services, allowing you do run Windows software from a Mac. Montjar also it to HOBLink JWT, a MS Terminal Server Client for Mac OS:

I nabbed Microsoft's "Remote Desktop Client" for OS X this morning after the keynote. It's pretty sweet. All respect to the fine people at HOBSoft and their HOBLink JWT client, but MS's free version just beat that thing up six ways to Sunday. Mostly what I like is it's Cocoa, so it loads and runs quick. It works as advertised, I was able to connect to my home web server and admin it just as easily as I can on a Windows PC via Terminal Services client. Supposedly it supports printing but I have no printer with which to test that. My server is a Win 2000 Server, and the boys in Redmond say it will connect to any of their servers from Win NT 4 TS through .NET server.

"It's like Citrix only not quite as flexible. I'm happy to have a free, native client so I can admin our servers from my iBook from the picnic tables outside." Very cool little program. It's found a home in my Dock!

July 18, 2002
Steven Palm also makes some comparisons to HOBLink JWT:

There is an update available for HOBLink JWT 2.3 on the HOB ftp server. You have to manually install it, which is a pain, but if you download the archive file and replace the files in the HOBLink "lib" directory with the new ones, it fixes the glitches with the keyboard mapping for @ and other characters.

By the way, the new Microsoft RDC program, which is their new Terminal Services (Remote Desktop Protocol) client for free for MacOS X, makes my recently purchased HOBLink licenses of somewhat questionable value.<sigh> At least I can use the licenses on a Linux machine I suppose.... But I was using rdesktop over there anyway. I tried it under MacOS X and XWindows, and it works fine but a few too many layers for the average person to use comfortably, IMHO.

July 19, 2002
John Byrne:

OS X RDP Client ROCKS. I've been using the new RDP client all day today with both an NT4TSE and Win2K Terminal Server. It's very responsive, printer mapping worked flawlessly with my postscript based Tektronix. It even maps drives and supports sound.

All in all this puts OS X on par with Win32 for Terminal Services, waaaay better than the Java client. (With a special note of thanks to the Mystery Machine that got us all through till now!)

July 19, 2002
Marco Martinez:

Incredible! I don't have to have two machines anymore, virtual PC was too slow, and this is snappy! It is fast! And I can log on to any XP machine and help people! I love it!

Microsoft has earned my respect in releasing something that IT people can really use, especially those that use Macs to support Windows machines.

July 19, 2002
Fred Tsui:

I, of course, downloaded RDC the moment I got to work yesterday, I listened to the keynote at home over a modem, and tried it out on the servers at Mission High School. It worked surprisingly well for a v1 of a MS product. My biggest complaint would be not having the ability to open multiple connections. Which HOBLink JWT is supposed to let you have the ability to do, but it is not very easy to set up. RDC does remember your last server you connected to. That is very nice.

At this point, I have to say that RDC is a better value (Free) then HOBLink JWT for Mac OS X users. If HOB can add more features (like multiple connections) faster than MS then their product could be worth the money.

July 23, 2002
John Byrne

I am still VERY pleased, but an update.

The client seems to be very sensitive about the quality of the connection. I've installed it at home, my Mac is on a network with a comcast online pipe to the Internet. The client seems to lose it's connection (requiring a relaunch of the app) too frequently compared to the other clients out there. It will just suddenly report connection lost. Note that it is speculation on my part that the connectivity quality is the issue. I plan to try using other bandwidth settings (I have it set to 128kps, which is the max up my cable connection supports) and see if that improves things. The Mac at my office getting the excellent results is essentially the same system software, but connected to a 100mb LAN. After ~11 hours on that yesterday I did not lose the connection even a single time.

I have also had at least 3 RDP client program crashes this morning on my home machine and have sent the console logs to Microsoft and Apple. Don't know yet if this is a more serious form of the connection drop or not. I did not have a single crash on my office Mac.

July 23, 2002
Bryce Steiner still prefers Virtual Network Computing (VNC), which is also free, but requires installing software on both computers:

I tried the Microsoft Remote Desktop Connection software. It worked ok, but it logged the person out on the computer and it changed the resolution from what I had it on the XP machine, also the colors supported seem to be only 256. Maybe I'm missing something in RDC, but I like VNC much better. It supports a lot more Operating Systems, better color, multiple connections, and native resolutions. The VNC client and server is native to every OS that I know of.

Microsoft's RDC crashes on dual-processor Macs

NOTE: Mac OS X 10.2.3 fixes this problem (see note below).

October 18, 2002 -- Richard Atwell reports a problem with Microsoft's Remote Desktop Connection in:

When I use RDC on Mac OS X 10.2 I can connect to my PC running XP Pro but then I crash RDC at the XP authentication dialog trying to enter my account name and password.

October 21, 2002
Egil Helland

This is probably due to using a dual processor Mac with RDC, and is a known bug. RDC does not work well with dual CPU Macs at all, and crashes all the time. Please see the Microsoft RDC newsgroup for more info (news:msnews.microsoft.com/microsoft.public.mac.rdc). MS has promised a new version which should fix this issue, but still no timeframe for this release as far as I know.

October 21, 2002
D. Casady mentions the dual-processor bug, but found that RDC worked with OS X 10.1.3:

I too experience the crash of RDC in Jaguar, but also had it occur in 10.1.5. The differences being that the crashes occurred on first, a dual 800 MHz G4, then on a new 1 GHz G4, both hooked to Ethernet. On my home system, a [single processor] 450 MHz G4 using a modem connection, no crashes of RDC in 10.1.5 or Jaguar.

The dual processor problem has recently been noted on the Microsoft "Mactopia" site, with the promise of an upcoming fix. However, on the dual 800 I did not have RDC crashes on 10.1.3. Odd... could the crashes also be related to Ethernet? or was there some change in 10.1.4 or 10.1.5?

October 21, 2002
Dan Corjulo

I have found RDC to be unusable under 10.2.1. Usually is crashes after a few mouse click. In each case I am connected to one of many Windows 2000 server.

The crash logs all start out like this:

Command: Remote Desktop Connection

PID: 492
Exception: EXC_BAD_ACCESS (0x0001)
Codes: KERN_PROTECTION_FAILURE (0x0002) at 0x00000005

October 21, 2002
Richard Jenkins

I've had this as well on my G4 DP 1 GHz (MDD). RDC was fine under 10.1.5 on my old G4 and my iBook, never had a problem with it. On my new G4 with 10.2.1, I can usually crash the RDC client by typing too fast - and I'm not a fast typist. I worked around it by typing slowly and deliberately, but it can be very frustrating; I've had it crash 10 or 15 times in an hour when trying to get something done quickly.

Not a problem on my machine at home, but that's over a dialup line and uses different settings.

As an experiment, I recently changed the key repeat rate of my G4 in the Keyboard Systems Preference pane, and it's been fine since then. I knocked it back one notch from "Fast."

November 15, 2002
Peet Dale

I have the same problem. But it is not related to the login process, it can happen at any time. In fact the only thing I can tie to the crash is that when I type fast it disconnects. Mind you, the system at the other end just pauses so all's not bad, but today I tried to send a single sentence email and it took about 12-15 logins to get it done.

Workaround: turn off one processor

October 23, 2002
Egil Helland

Microsoft's solution to this is to temporarily disable one of the CPUs. If you want to switch off your second processor to stop RDC crashing, enter nvram boot-args="cpus=1" into Terminal as a root user. See this page on Apple's Developer site for more info.

Jag 10.2.3 fixed MS RDC dual-processor problem.

January 6, 2003 -- It appears that the recent Mac OS X 10.2.3 update fixed a problem with Microsoft's Remote Desktop Connection on dual-processor Macs. Randall Quon tried RDC with 10.2.3 on a dual-processor Mac, and it worked with out crashing. He also forwarded this note from Microsoft's Microsoft's newsgroup (microsoft.public.mac.rdc):

Apple Computer released Mac OS X version 10.2.3 to the public yesterday. This new version of Mac OS X contains a fix for the issue that caused Mac RDC to be unstable on dual-processor Macs. With this update, Microsoft has amended the system requirements for Mac RDC to be as follows:

For Macintosh computers with a single processor, RDC requires Mac OS X version 10.1 or later.

For Macintosh computers with dual processors, RDC requires Mac OS X version 10.2.3 or later.

The update from Mac OS X 10.2 or later is available from Apple Computer.

Thank you all for your patience. If you continue to have difficulties with Mac RDC after updating to Mac OS X 10.2.3, please don't hesitate to post here.

Erik Schwiebert
Microsoft Corporation

Problem with specifying a port and a fix

January 27, 2003
Rick Gutlon

The Problem

We're using MS' Remote Desktop Connection Client (RDC) to connect to a Windows 2000 Terminal Server. It works great and functions w/o error as long as we do not have to specify a port address in the connection window.

However, if we try to tack on a :portnumber to either an IP or domain address (i.e. x.x.x.x:port), the Mac RDC client returns an error and does not even attempt to connect. This is a necessity when connecting to a TS listening on a port other than the default of 3389.

The Cause

I finally did get a response from MS regarding this issue, which they confirmed is a bug in the Mac RDC client.

By default, Win2K Terminal Servers are set to listen to port 3389.

For security purposes, it is not uncommon for an administrator to change this port on the Terminal Server (lots of folks out there probing port 3389 looking for unsecured connections).

In the current Mac RDC, port 3389 is "hardcode" into the client and cannot be changed. In the PC RDC, you can adjust the connection port by specifying it in the connection string (x.x.x.x:port)

The fix

The good news is I found a shareware solution by Wickedly Simple Software. Their PortReflector (US $10) software allows one to "map" outbound ports on the Mac. Not having a Mac myself (I'm the PC guy needing a solution for a client), Bill Keirstead at W Wickedly Simple was kind enough to run some tests with me against my Terminal Server. It worked like a charm.

MS Remote Desktop Connection bug with time zones.

October 13, 2004
Daniel Foshee reports a problem with the Mac version of Microsoft's free Remote Desktop Connection.

A known issue with the Mac client version 1.02 when connecting to a Terminal Server is that (unlike the PC client) the Mac Remote Desktop Connection client does not give the time zone information to the Terminal Server. This means that any file creation or modification date is five hours ahead. If you are forced to use Outlook 2003 on the Terminal Server (because Entourage doesn't meet your needs in a corporate environment), this also means that all of your e-mails, meeting requests or responses are five hours ahead.

From the Premier Support web page:

We do not support this functionality in the MAC RDC 1.0 as it only supports the 5.1 protocol and TZR is a functionality of 5.2.

Basically this is a known issue with no workaround and will be targeted for the next release, whenever that happens.

October 20, 2004
Daniel Foshee

Version 1.03 does not address the time zone redirection issue. To be fair, it does not purport to, but rather deals with basic stability and Office 2004 compatibility.

I've spoken further with Microsoft Premier Support reps who have called to say that they've passed on my comments to the appropriate Product Managers.

Workaround

October 20, 2004
Brian Willett suggested a partial workaround:

It is possible to re-select the time zone for the session which corrects the message time-stamps and Calendar times.

Unfortunately, the time-zone change does not persist between sessions, so users have to do this each time they log in to the terminal server. Fortunately, however, the adjustment is very easy to do. Once you log in, you simply double-click the clock in the Windows Task Bar, re-select the time zone from the pop-up menu in the dialog that appears and then click Okay. Not very elegant, but far better than trying to compensate for the time zone offset in your head.

By the way, I have verified that this limitation, which I first encountered while using RDC 1.0.1, is NOT addressed in the new RDC 1.0.3 client that was just released earlier this week, either.

October 29, 2004
Daniel Foshee points out a limitation:

Brian's workaround to change the time zone each time they log in would presuppose that the users would have that ability; any such control panels are locked out for our users.

If you've seen this problem

Conflict between RDC 1.0.3 and QuarkXPress 6.1.

October 20, 2004
Brian Willett also reported a conflict between RDC, versions 1.0.3 and earlier, and QuarkXPress 6.1:

OS X users at my company who use Microsoft's Remote Desktop Connection (RDC) client for access to Outlook email have encountered a conflict between RDC/Outlook for Windows and QuarkXPress 6.1. When QuarkXPress 6.1 is running in the Mac OS X (10.3.5) environment along with RDC, and the user copies some text to the clipboard from Outlook running within the RDC session, the user will subsequently experience long pauses when mouse-clicking in Outlook/RDC.

This pausing behavior persists for as long as the text copied from the Windows environment is resident in the clipboard buffer. If the user quits QuarkXPress or copies over the clipboard buffer with data copied from the Mac environment, the pauses cease and normal functioning resumes.

I have posted a full description of this problem on the Quark user forums, but as yet no one has replied to confirmed this behavior. I have had several different users here report this problem to me and I have been able to duplicate it myself.

If you've seen this problem

Running multiple simultaneous RDC sessions.

January 28, 2005
James Schwacofer describes how he does it:

I run multiple instances of RDC on my PowerBook. The way to do this is to duplicate RDC in the Applications folder and when you need a second instance of RDC start up the duplicated copy of RDC. You can make copies and copies and have multiple instances all at your finger tips.

January 28, 2005
Phil Shepard says that he can do it with settings on Terminal Server, but isn't specific:

I just helped a business client configure a Windows 2003 Terminal Services Server and configured several Macs with OS X 10.3.7 and Microsoft RDC 1.0.3 to connect with it. If the Options in RDC are set properly and the TS is set up properly, then multiple Macs can connect at the same time and with very high speed. Before I tweaked the Options in RDC, the performance was much slower. Before I properly finalized the configuration of the TS, only 1 RDC could connect at a time.

January 28, 2005
Michael Pardee uses a free utility called RDC Launcher:

You can search the net for a free app called RDC Launcher that will allow you to run multiple RDC instances. Very handy.

I don't see the same RDC performance issues that Angelo sees. I manage over 400 Windows based servers (NT4, Windows 2000, Windows 2003) from a G4 PowerBook and I don't think it performs *that* bad. It is awful when you connect to a Windows XP box though.

RDC faster in VPC than in native OS X.

January 26, 2005
Angelo Fonte has found that Microsoft's Remote Desktop Client (RDC) for Windows runs faster in Virtual PC than does the Mac RDC in OS X:

We use a mixed OS X and Windows environment, mainly using Windows Servers for SQL/Oracle and Windows 2003 TS (for business-centric Windows apps)...I noticed that the Mac RDC app for Windows TS appeared to be slower (and has an annoying visual refreshing roll-over) than the Windows RDC on our few Windows 2000 boxes.

I recently installed Virtual PC 7 with Windows 2000 and for kicks decided to install the latest Windows RDC app. I connected to our office Windows TS from home (Broadband/Airport) with my PowerBook G4 1.25 and was astonished by the extremely significant performance improvement. That's right, using the latest Windows RDC on Windows 2000/Virtual PC from home was faster than using the native Mac RDC for TS...

January 31, 2005
Laurie Davis

I read with interest the report on RDC running faster within VPC as a Windows applet compared with the Mac version running natively under OS X. Having just installed VPC on my home Mac G5 dual 1.8 GHz, 2 GB RAM, I can confirm this is the case.

Connecting to my work IBM desktop 2.4 GHz PC feels very lively and I can use many of the apps such as MS Office 2003, remotely, with little apparent speed hit - for non-graphics intensive tasks.

Interestingly they seem more responsive then the same apps running within the VPC emulation on the Mac (non-remotely). I can also confirm that RDC running natively on the Mac does suffer from a sort of slight 'bounce' when a [remote] window refreshes. This is not apparent on the Windows version.

How to run multiple simultaneous RDC sessions.

Several readers how to run more than one instance of Microsoft's Remote Desktop Client (RDC) at the same time.

January 28, 2005
James Schwacofer

I run multiple instances of RDC on my PowerBook. The way to do this is to duplicate RDC in the Applications folder and when you need a second instance of RDC start up the duplicated copy of RDC. You can make copies and copies and have multiple instances all at your finger tips.

January 28, 2005
Phil Shepard

I just helped a business client configure a Windows 2003 Terminal Services Server and configured several Macs with OS X 10.3.7 and Microsoft RDC 1.0.3 to connect with it. If the Options in RDC are set properly and the TS is set up properly, then multiple Macs can connect at the same time and with very high speed. Before I tweaked the Options in RDC, the performance was much slower. Before I properly finalized the configuration of the TS, only 1 RDC could connect at a time.

January 28, 2005
Michael Pardee uses a free utility called RDC Launcher:

You can search the net for a free app called RDC Launcher that will allow you to run multiple RDC instances. Very handy.

I don't see the same RDC performance issues that Angelo sees. I manage over 400 Windows based servers (NT4, Windows 2000, Windows 2003) from a G4 PowerBook and I don't think it performs *that* bad. It is awful when you connect to a Windows XP box though.

TIP: MS RDC Client, connecting to live console session

August 1, 2007

Michael Curtis sent in this tip for using Microsoft Remote Desktop Connection Client for Mac:

I am not sure if anyone had mentioned this, but with MS RDC, if you hold down the Apple key when you hit Connect it will connect you to the live console session and not a secondary session. This can be handy if you want to control an app that is already running in the live session.


RDC with Cisco VPN Client 4.9.01 interrupts connection w/ network drive

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Eric Andreen reported a problem where Microsoft Remote Desktop Connection Client for Mac seems to disconnect his network-connected storage:

I use Microsoft Remote Desktop Connection (RDC) along with Cisco VPN 4.9.01 to connect to my employer's Windows network. So far, this has worked very well, but with one irritating problem: The connection with my network drive (which stores ALL of my families documents, media files, etc.) is interrupted and disconnected when I connect. This is inconvenient, as I like to be able to go back and forth between my RDC connection and working on my home network.

The problem does not seem to be Cisco VPN, since nothing seems to happen when I connect. My network drives do however disconnect when I open RDC and connect. I get a message "Server connection interrupted." My Internet connection stays operational (obviously it must for RDC to stay connected).

I wonder if this is a port issue, or something related to my router? It is interesting to note that when I startup to Windows XP, and connect with Cisco VPN and RDC the connection is successful, and my network shares remain connected. So this problem seems to be specific to OS X.

If you've seen this problem


Alternatives to RDC

An alternative to Microsoft Remote Desktop Client for Mac

July 25, 2007

David Rays told us about TSclientX, a Windows Terminal Services client for Mac OS X. Like Microsoft Remote Desktop Client (RDC) TSclientX lets you control a Windows XP machine from a Mac. The developer says it is faster and more stable on Intel and PowerPC Macs than is RDC, and has a few additional features. Rays recommende it:

I've recently fallen in love with TSclientX. It's a huge improvement over Microsoft 's current RDC client. Having said that, I just read the other day that Microsoft is coming out with a new and improved RDC client for the Mac.

If you 've tried TSclientX what you think of it.

More alternatives to Microsoft RDC

July 27, 2007

Several readers wrote to comment on Wednesday’s report (above) about alternatives to Microsoft’s free Remote Desktop Connection Client for Mac (RDC) for operating Windows applications remotely from a Mac. (The PCs need to have Terminal Services turned on.) One reader vouched for TSClientX, and two other readers recommend another option, called CoRD, which features multiple sessions.

Adrian Burgess commented on Wednesday’s report on TSClientX:

TSClientX is a great RDC client. Well, it is a great front end to the Unix rdesktop application which is needed to be installed first. TSClientX runs in x11 and provides a nice interface to connect with. It is very stable and has been a great tool for administering a mixed environment. It also handles VNC connections.

Joe Russell found another alternative to RDC called CoRD, which he likes for its multi-session abilities:

Just thought I'd mention another RDC/RDP client that I came across recently: CoRD.

We've honestly been happy with Microsoft's RDC client for it's reasonable (however not flawless) stability for occasional use. But one person in our group needs to work with multiple sessions (and encoding farm) and that's when he's forced to use VNC -which we all know how pleasurable that is.

With CoRD, we're able to maintain several sessions all thru a pretty simple interface that also has a few nifty features.

The developer has a few mentions on requirements, that being it only works on OS X 10.4 (not 10.3 or 10.5) and only Windows machines running built-in terminal services. And VNC and the built in OS X remote desktop server aren't supported by CoRD.

Brad Anderson also likes CoRD:

You mentioned on your site a alternative application to take the place of Microsoft’s Remote Desktop Client for Mac (TSClientX). I thought I would let you know of another one, CoRD, is pretty good as well.

I’ve been using it for a while and absolutely LOVE it. Biggest plus is the fact that you can be connected to multiple terminal sessions at the same time.

It has a couple issues (crashes once in a while), but it’s still in beta as far as I know and hope that all will be fixed soon. Check it out.

If you 've checked out CoRD or TSclientX what you think.

TIP: Adding Multiple sessions for RDC with RDC Menu

July 30, 2007

Robert Liebsch commented on previous reports about alternatives to Remote Desktop Connection Client (RDC) for Mac OS X. (RDC enables Macs to operate Windows PCs and applications over a network.) Liebsch found an add-on for RDC that lets you create multiple sessions:

Regarding CoRD, TSclientX and RDC. I’ve tried them all and they are all sufficient.

I think I still prefer MS's RDC, with one add on: RDC Menu. It installs a Menu bar addition that will allow you to spawn multiple RDC sessions without cloning the application. And, as long as you don't go full screen, you can use expose or simple Apple-Tab to navigate between the sessions/systems.

It even supports bookmarks now.

If you 've tried RDC Menu what you think of it.

More comparisons of MS RDC Client with RDC Menu, CoRD, and TSclientX

August 1, 2007

Several readers responded to reports earlier this week about alternatives to Microsoft Remote Desktop Connection Client for Mac.

Dave Halln compared CoRD to Microsoft RDC Client with the RDC Menu add-on:

I think I still prefer MS's RDC, with one add on: RDC Menu. I am a registered user and like the response from the developer. However, was interested in your article about CoRD and gave it a go. My thoughts:

RDC:

  • Plus: You can add to the menu
  • Plus: Good speed and works through Netgear VPN
  • Minus: Login seems to be broken, auto-login always fails

CoRD:

  • Plus: I like the paned approach
  • Minus: Full-screen mode seems clunky
  • Minus: Cannot add to the menu
  • Minus: Speed through VPN seems slower than RDC

Markus compared using RDC Client with RDC Menu to using TSclientX:

I have been using RDC Menu for quite some time, and I really like it. Particularly if you have to connect to a number of computers, it is very convenient. It stores all your settings for the connection in bookmarks. Always worked flawlessly for me.

I have also used (and paid for) TSclientX, as initially RDC was rather unstable on Intel Macs but since discovering RDC Menu I have not used it anymore.

Current MacWindows News

Author of RDC Menu describes future plans

August 11, 2007

Gil Burns, the primary author and programmer for RDC Menu, notes that the current version does note work with Remote Desktop Connection Client 2.0 Beta:

I saw the comparison on your website of the RDC + RDC Menu vs CoRD or TSclientX. I would like to mention that the current version of RDC Menu was written for use with MS RDC 1.x, not for MS RDC 2.0 beta.

Microsoft made lots of changes between the releases. The setting file format is completely different. (Though 2.0 beta mostly works with the old settings files.) Go ahead and open a 1.0 and a 2.0 settings file with TextEdit, and you will immediately see they are very different. RDC 1.0 used sort of a MS version of a plist file. RDC 2.0 is actually just a real Apple plist file. You can open it and look at it in Apple Property List Editor if you want to.

The way they store RDC passwords on the Keychain is completely different. The way they handle the Console connect option is also different. The issue with "Login seems to be broken, auto-login always fails" is primarily because of these changes MS made between RDC 1.x and 2.0. I really just want to let you know that I am working on an update to RDC Menu that will correct that issue (and others) when using RDC Menu with the new RDC 2.0 beta. It should be available sometime in the next week. ( I got access to the new RDC 2.0 public beta the same day as everyone else.)

TIPS from the publisher of TSclientX, an RDC alternative

Tuesday, September 4, 2007

Daniel Milisic, the publisher of TSclientX, sent us some new information as well as clarifications of previous reader reports. TSclientX is an alternative to Microsoft's RDC, for operating Windows applications remotely from a Mac. Milisic's advice:

Glad to hear others have been able to benefit from open source software like CoRD and TSclientX.

TSclientX is essentially a bunch of apps from the Unix/Linux world -- primarily rdesktop and tsclient -- skinned-out to look as Aqua-native as you'll get out of an X11 app. (Everything that makes it up is open-source so if someone said they "paid for" TSclientX I'd suggest they're being taken for a ride.) I originally bundled this together for the Mac because RDC was so frustrating. I've got faith in the Microsoft Mac BU folks that we'll have a better RDC, but hey, for now, choice is good!

There's also a checkbox for "Attach to Console" in TSclientX. Note only RDP5 boxes (Win XP and newer) support this. Folder redirection is also supported and there's a (non TSclientX specific) note on the site on how to deal with printing.

One more thing: TSclientX is all self-contained in a .app bundle so you don't need to install rdesktop or anything else (besides Apple-supplied X11). Seemed like there was some confusion on that issue.

TIPS from the publisher of TSclientX, an RDC alternative

Tuesday, September 4, 2007

Daniel Milisics, the publisher of TSclientX, sent us some new information as well as clarifications to previous reader reports. TSclientX is an alternative to Microsoft's RDC, for operating Windows applications remotely from a Mac. Milisics' advice:

Glad to hear others have been able to benefit from open source software like CoRD and TSclientX.

TSclientX is essentially a bunch of apps from the Unix/Linux world -- primarily rdesktop and tsclient -- skinned-out to look as Aqua-native as you'll get out of an X11 app. (Everything that makes it up is open-source so if someone said they "paid for" TSclientX I'd suggest they're being taken for a ride.) I originally bundled this together for the Mac because RDC was so frustrating. I've got faith in the Microsoft Mac BU folks that we'll have a better RDC, but hey, for now, choice is good!

There's also a checkbox for "Attach to Console" in TSclientX. Note only RDP5 boxes (Win XP and newer) support this. Folder redirection is also supported and there's a (non TSclientX specific) note on the site on how to deal with printing.

One more thing: TSclientX is all self-contained in a .app bundle so you don't need to install rdesktop or anything else (besides Apple-supplied X11). Seemed like there was some confusion on that issue.

Current MacWindows News


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